Metal Roofing Blog

What Homeowners Need to Know About Metal Roofs

If you own a home or commercial property, investing in a metal roof can be a tremendous benefit to your property. Regardless of whether you want to fix up your home to live in it forever, renovate your home for a higher listing price, or revamp your commercial property to attract more business and generate more income, a metal roof can be a fantastic upgrade for any property.


Unfortunately, many people still hold several misconceptions about metal roofs, and clearing up this misinformation can help property owners recognize the real value of investing in new metal roofs. If you want a new metal roof, read the following frequently asked questions and common myths to clarify any misunderstandings you might have about metal roofs so you can make a properly informed decision for your property.

Q: Won’t a Metal Roof Make the Home Too Hot in Summer and Too Cold in Winter?

A: Many people assume that since a metal roof absorbs heat better than an asphalt shingle roof, it would logically follow that the metal roof would make a structure hotter on the inside. This isn’t true, and the heat absorption qualities of a metal roof actually create a temperature barrier around the structure, insulating it better and keeping temperatures more comfortable inside. Many homeowners who upgrade to metal roofs actually see savings on their energy bills within a few months of installation due to the fantastic insulating qualities of their new roofs.

Q: Metal Roofs Don’t Last Very Long

A: Metals generally face susceptibility to corrosion and rusting. However, metal roofing panels from leading manufactures have galvanized protective coating that prevent rusting and other damage with regular care. Metal roof panels can withstand tremendous punishment from severe rain, high winds, and even hail and generally stand up to harsh weather better than asphalt shingle roofs.
Metal roofs also last much longer than asphalt shingle roofs. While even the most well-crafted and professionally installed asphalt shingle roofs will only last about 20 to 25 years under ideal conditions, a professionally installed metal roof from one of the leading manufacturers will last 50 to 70 years or even longer with appropriate care. They will also require far less regular maintenance than asphalt shingle roofs.

Q: Are Metal Roofs Bad for the Environment?

A: When you replace an asphalt shingle roof, the old shingles will probably wind up in a landfill. The manufacturing processes required to produce asphalt shingle roofs aren’t exactly environmentally friendly, either. By comparison, the leading manufacturers of metal roof panels use almost entirely recycled raw materials. When the metal roof reaches the end of its lifespan, the roof panels are entirely recyclable as well. Since a metal roof can last three or more times as long as an asphalt shingle roof, upgrading to a metal roof could potentially prevent three entire roofs’ worth of asphalt shingles from winding up in landfills.

In addition to the reduced ecological impact of manufacturing and disposal, metal roofs can provide other surprisingly environmentally friendly perks. By providing better insulation to a home or commercial building, metal roofs can reduce the load on the structure’s heating and cooling system, resulting in less fossil fuel consumption. Metal roofs are also ideal for solar panel installation, potentially reducing fossil fuel dependency even more.

Q: Are Metal Roofs Acceptable in Every Area?

A: You might wonder if a metal roof is the best choice for your home. You’ll be happy to learn that any MidWest location is an excellent area for a metal roof. Most of the MidWest sees a variable climate and wide range of weather and temperatures throughout the year, and metal roofs can withstand much more punishment than standard asphalt shingle roofs. A new metal roof can stand up to the harsh summer heat or the frigidly cold winters with stellar performance and consistent reliability year after year.

Q: Don’t Metal Roofs Cost Much More Than Asphalt Shingle Roofs?

A: It’s true that installing a new metal roof will probably cost more than installing a new asphalt shingle roof, but that’s only for the initial installation. The long-term savings from choosing a metal roof can make up for this difference and then some, typically leading to tens of thousands of dollars in savings for most property owners who opt for metal roofs. For example, an asphalt shingle roof will last 25 to 30 years at most under ideal conditions, but a metal roof can last three times as long with even less need for maintenance. This can potentially save a property owner the cost of two or more full roof replacements during the course of the metal roof’s lifespan.
Metal roofs also encounter far fewer maintenance issues over time compared to asphalt shingle roofs. While a property owner with an asphalt shingle roof may have occasional leaks, damaged shingles, or other issues requiring repairs, owners of metal roofs won’t need to worry about these issues. While metal roofs can suffer occasional scratches, they will rarely suffer damage severe enough to require panel replacement or re-seaming.

Q: Aren’t Metal Roofs Very Noisy?

A: While it may seem logical to assume that a metal roof would make much more noise than a softer asphalt shingle roof during a rainstorm, property owners who upgrade to metal roofs typically notice the noise is no worse than it was with their old asphalt shingle roofs. You can enjoy better protection from the elements with a new metal roof without worrying about excessive noise from heavy rainfall.

Metal Roofs Are Durable and Cost Effective

There are countless benefits to investing in a new metal roof anywhere, but it’s vital to do your research and prevent misinformation from corrupting your decision-making process. Metal roofs offer fantastic value in many different ways. Homeowners throughout the MidWest should thoroughly consider their options when it’s time for roof upgrades; metal roofs can provide lasting value and surprising benefits for any residential or commercial property.

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